Posted on

Paradigm Publications Upcoming Release (2022-2023)

A Chinese Medical Reference: Symptoms, Patterns, Diseases, Acupoints, Medicinals, and Formulas eBook

The English-language literature of Chinese medicine lacks reference materials. Since the very first acupuncture programs decades ago, students have compiled lists of textbook items they need to memorize. Students today still make lists, a somewhat surprising fact in a digital age. A Chinese Medical Reference: Symptoms, Patterns, Diseases, Acupoints, Medicinals, and Formulas is a complete set of lists designed to save all the work. This comprehensive reference work is compiled to the highest professional standards from original Chinese sources, and its digital format ensures easy searchability and maximum affordability.

As the title suggests, A Chinese Medical Reference: Symptoms, Patterns, Diseases, Acupoints, Medicinals, and Formulas presents the key Chinese concepts thematically in six sections, with each concept forming an entry. It presents 320+ symptoms, 130+ patterns, 130+ diseases, 400+ acupoints, 570+ medicinals, and 260+ medicinal formulas. With a total of 1,800 entries, it covers a comprehensive range of concepts, including the most-tested and commonly used, plus all the most-searched items in a course of study.

Throughout, Chinese terms are given in simplified and complex characters, so that they can be found by anyone who knows Chinese. Pinyin is given in accented and unaccented form, so that users can search whether they know the tones or have a system capable of entering tone marks. General terms can be searched by English, acupoints by alphanumeric codes, and medicinals by English and Latin pharmacognostic names.

The material has been drawn from other works. Symptoms, patterns, and diseases come from Chinese Medicine: Theories of Modern Practice, while acupoints, medicinals, and formulas have been extracted from our databases. Those works have all been compiled from Chinese sources, ensuring that students receive information of the same scope and quality as taught in China’s professional medical colleges.

A major problem for students is terminological inconsistencies between English-language authors. One and same concept may be represented by one term in one author and by a different term in another. Even more confusing, one and same term may refer to different concepts depending on the author. A Chinese Medical Reference: Symptoms, Patterns, Diseases, Acupoints, Medicinals, and Formulas avoids this problem with rigorous consistency. Each concept is referred to by a single English term that closely mirrors the Chinese original. Wherever that concept appears, it is always referred to by the same name.

When a concept is referred to by a single term every time it is used, students can develop their understanding of the concept by seeing how it used in different contexts. The digital format, so much more practical than the indexes contained in paper books, allows readers to search through a whole text, find each context, thereby enhancing their understanding. Since the digital versions of other works by Wiseman and his colleagues all use the same terminology, searches can be performed over a wide range of literature, including:

  • Chinese Medicine: The Ideas that Shaped It
  • Chinese Medicine: Theories of Modern Practice
  • Comprehensive Chinese Materia Medica
  • Concise Chinese Materia Medica
  • Fundamentals of Chinese Acupuncture
  • Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine
  • Jīn Guì Yào Lüè
  • Practical Dictionary of Chinese Medicine
  • Shāng Hán Lùn

It is difficult to emphasize enough how digital information revolutionizes the learning process. Digital searches are far more efficient than look-ups from index entries. Instead of poring over isolated text, students can trace concepts throughout the text they are reading and beyond. Instead of making hand-written notes and indelible color marks on a paper copy, e-books give readers the ability to make editable bookmarks and highlights to personalize their information according to their changing needs. This reduces the need for passive memorization by rote and makes learning an active process of constant investigation.

Symptoms: The symptoms section starts with general conditions and then presents localized conditions from head to toe. This arrangement has the advantage of enhancing the traditional four examinations scheme, whereby certain symptoms of specific loci may appear in more than one of four places. Thus, all urinary symptoms are placed together, as are stool symptoms, even though they might normally be divided among the inspection, listening and smelling, and inquiry examinations in diagnostic textbooks. Each symptom is described in such as a way as to enable students to easily identify it and differentiate it from others. Indication of the patterns or diseases in which each symptom can appear further offers students avenues for further searches to develop their knowledge.

Patterns: The patterns section lists the patterns included in modern Chinese-language diagnostic textbooks. The information provided includes main names, alternate names, key signs, full description, related diseases, pathogenesis, analysis of signs, treatments, combined patterns, and further developments. The content of this section is drawn from Chinese Medicine: Theories of Modern Practice.

Diseases: The diseases section includes many conditions that, though scantily discussed in English language textbooks, are commonly seen in Chinese-language basic theory texts. All 130 commonly presented diseases are included.

Acupoints: The acupoints section includes all 365 channel points, as well a selection of commonly used non-channel points. The information provided for each acupoint includes location (as given in modern textbooks), classical location (as given in premodern literature), local anatomy, actions, indications, stimulus applied, and point categories

Medicinals: The medicinals section includes a broader range of agents than Western students are normally required to master. Items are arranged according to their actions, as in textbooks. The information provided for each item includes Chinese alternate names, properties (nature and flavor), actions and indications, dosage and method of administration, product quality, and production area. Note that the same information can be found in Comprehensive Chinese Materia Medica (Paradigm Publications, 2023), which contains over 6,000 medicinals in alphabetical order.

Formulas: The formulas section is arranged according to actions, as in textbooks. The information for each item includes ingredients, method of preparation, actions, indications, formula rationale (explaining what each ingredient does), and variations. Since individual ingredients can be found in the medicinals section, and the indications can be found in the symptoms, patterns, and diseases sections, students have a vast amount of information at their fingertips in one e-book.

Posted on

Paradigm Publications Upcoming Release (2022-2023)

Chinese-English Dictionary of Chinese Medicine eBook

Containing over 33,000 terms, the Chinese-English Dictionary of Chinese Medicine is the largest, fully searchable list of Chinese medical terms ever published. It is the only sufficiently comprehensive list of Chinese medical terms to be an ultimate go-to for any translator, student, or clinician. It contains a vast array of general terms, including the 5,000 or more of Practical Dictionary of Chinese Medicine (Paradigm Publications, 1997). It also contains the 1,500 standard and alternate acupoint names from Grasping the Wind (Paradigm Publications, 1989) and over 10,000 standard and alternate names of medicinals described in the Comprehensive Chinese Materia Medica (Paradigm Publications, coming in 2023) derived from the Zhōng Yào Dà Cí Diǎn.

The present e-book version offers maximum searchability without the need of indexes. Chinese terms are given in simplified and complex characters, so that they can be found by anyone who knows Chinese. Pinyin is given in accented and unaccented form, so that users can search by it whether they know the tones or have a system capable of entering tone marks. General terms can be searched by English, acupoints by alphanumeric codes, and medicinals can be searched by English and Latin pharmacognostic names.

To make for the greatest utility without overly burdening the text, a standard set of graphical indicators are used throughout this and other related e-books. Square brackets ([ ]) indicate elements of terms that can be omitted (such as omissible elements of medicinal names) or notes to Chinese and English terms. A double asterisk (⁑) indicates polysemous medicinal names. A gray sidebar in the left-hand margin indicates a commonly used item.

This dictionary has a history of over thirty years of continual expansion and refinement. It began with a database created while writing Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine (Paradigm Publications, 1985). It was published in the form of Glossary of Chinese Medical Terms (Paradigm Publications in 1990). It was expanded and republished in the form of the English-Chinese, Chinese-English Dictionary of Chinese Medicine (Hunan Science and Technology Press, 1995). And in 2014, after further expansion, it was made available as the Online TCM Dictionary on Paradigm Publications’ website.

These decades of development and publication have given the terms here presented the benefit of other scholars’ contributions, as well as the refinements inspired by public critique. Chinese-English Dictionary of Chinese Medicine is an invaluable asset for translators and teachers engaged in compiling or presenting information from primary sources. As a bilingual term list, it has met the critical test of actual translations of the classical Chinese medical texts, the Shāng Hán Lùn (Paradigm Publications, 1999) and Jīn Guì Yào Lüè (Paradigm Publications, 2013) Chinese Medicine: Theories of Modern Practice (Paradigm Publications, 2022) shows this terminology to be up to the challenge of presenting the entire theoretical knowledge of professional Chinese medical education.

This e-book version offers translators suggestions for translation problems they come across in their work, without proprietary restrictions and at an extremely low cost. However, the notion that Chinese medicine does not possess a terminology that requires a corresponding terminology in English and other languages has not faded from the Western world. In view of this, the present work also includes an introduction explaining issues surrounding terminology and translation.

Posted on

Paradigm Publications Upcoming Releases

CHINESE MEDICINE: THEORIES OF MODERN PRACTICE

Chinese Medicine: Theories of Modern Practice describes the foundational doctrines, physiology, pathology, diagnostics, and therapeutics of Chinese medicine at the same breadth and depth as the basic-theory textbooks used in China. If you have ever thought that you would like to know what a Chinese professor would teach about a theory, pattern or clinical case this is the book for you.

 Chinese Medicine: Theories of Modern Practice is the first two of three volumes for people who want to understand Chinese medicine from the Chinese viewpoint. It is also for anyone who requires practical professional information at the level of detail required in the professional courses taught in the People’s Republic of China.

Click Here to Read More…

CHINESE MEDICINE: THE IDEAS THAT SHAPED IT

Chinese Medicine: The Ideas that Shaped It is one of three volumes for people who want to understand Chinese medicine from the Chinese viewpoint.   It is intended for those contemplating the study of acupuncture and Chinese medicine, students early in their career, or practitioners interested in the background not provided in their clinical education.  It is also suitable for laypersons who want to understand more about Chinese medicine in its native culture. Although it is available separately, it provides excellent preparation for Chinese Medicine: Theories of Modern Practice for students who require practical professional information at the level of detail required in the professional courses taught in the People’s Republic of China.

Click Here to Read More…

Posted on

Elisabeth Rochat De La Vallée, Next Online Lectures 2020-2021

Names Of The Points: Explore the names of the points by using Chinese names to create a deeper understanding. Improve your clinical use of these points and deepen your understanding of their function.

Blending the rich poetic quality of the point names with their practical application, this lecture
presents an in-depth study of the point’s names as the result of years of research in the Chinese
classics as well as work and discussion with practitioners of Chinese medicine.

Friday Oct.30 : 10 am to 1 pm PDT – 2 pm to 5 pm PDT
This class explores the rela/on between the point’s name and loca/on as well as func/ons.
Discuss how the point’s names are related to the body form or func/on, cosmic order, royal
palace, heavenly bodies as well as earthly features. Explain metaphors and analogies.

Monday Nov. 2, 9, 16 : 12:30 to 3:30 PDT
Each of these classes will study a specific group (or series) of points, connected or instance
either through a common character in their names, or a similar loca/on on the body, or their
belonging to one sec/on of a meridian and the story told by that sequence.

Information, CEU and registrations: Robyn.sodders@gmail.com

explore FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS in Chinese Classical Thought, on Tuesday, 10 am to 12 pm PDT – 1 to 3 pm EDT –
6 to 8 pm England – 7 – 10 pm Israël

  • Tuesday January 5 The Mawangdui Funeral Banner
  • Tuesday January 19 Life and Death in Ancient China
  • Tuesday February 2 The Hun and Po souls

Tuesday March 16 & 30, April 13 & 27 : What is QI ? The Different kinds of Qi.

Information & registrations: yossimem@gmail.com

Link to the PDF

Posted on

“The Banner for a Chinese Lady Going to Paradise”

This week we sent Elisabeth Rochat de la Vallée’s remarkable work, “The Banner for a Chinese Lady Going to Paradise,” to production. It is a major contribution to the literature on Chinese philosophy and medicine. It also is an innovative eBook that uses the underlaying “epub encoding” to enhance readers’ ability to study the text and illustrations.

Elisabeth comments on the work:

In 1974, a short time after discovery of the Mawangdui Tombs in 1972, I was introduced to the Banner through a presentation made by Fr. Claude Larre during an International Symposium on relations between China and the West. He had understood the importance of this painting, not only from the archeological viewpoint, but also for the unique insight that it provides into China at the beginning of the second century BCE.

Through the use of symbols and mythic animals, the Banner reflects the beliefs of the Chinese people on how life appears, develops and disappears, as well as their hope to pass into the peace of Paradise. With splendid drawings and sumptuous colors, it offers anyone a direct grasp and a feeling for the emerging of life as a crossing of yin and yang, of its development as an ascension from the depth of the Earth to the everlasting serenity of Heaven.

The Banner is like a vivid illustration of what we read in the Chinese classics, a diving into the soul of ancient China. Reaching the depths of hope and beliefs of people living far away and long ago, we access what they have in common with us. The Banner speaks directly to us, not only of ancient China but of our present-day life and expectations.

These are the reasons why I fell in love with the Banner and accepted the challenge to present it to my readers.

Does the book tell you how to treat a dread disease?  No.

Does it make the use of medicinals in formulas crystal clear?  No.

Does it describe previously unknown distinctions between acupoints?  No.

What then does it teach us, if not keys to treatment?

It teaches us the epistemological context in which thinkers of the era understood the medical classics at the root of Chinese medicine. This is one of the most important things we can know because how we interpret Chinese medical principles can only wander away from their origin if we have a false sense of the culture in which those ideas arose and flourished. Without the view this e-Learning gives us, we risk accepting ideas that would be impossible for the ancient scholars to have believed.

In this regard, one of the most interesting aspects of The Banner is the elaboration of yin / yang and the five phases in the cosmological symbols. In exactly the same way the qualities of the organs are complexes of yin and yang – yin within yang, yang within yin – the dragons portrayed on the banner are symbolic lessons in five phase and yin – yang distinctions, expressed as shapes, colors, contours and symbols.  The Banner shows us a cosmos where the principles of systematic correspondence are the only principles, yin – yang is the only reality.

Elisabeth Rochat de la Vallée has given us a look inside the minds of humans who speak to us through the human arts of millennia past. This doesn’t happen very often.